July 22nd, 2017
ratcreature: RatCreature smokes Crack (crack)
Yer a Wizard, Parser! by takumiismypatronus. Slash, Kent Parson/OMC (8586 words)
Check Please!/Harry Potter
This was such a fun crossover, and somewhat unusually for Harry Potter crossovers it is not AU for either canon.
July 20th, 2017
resonant: Little Red Riding Hood and wolf. Text: "La beta noire." (beta noire)
posted by [personal profile] resonant at 09:23pm on 20/07/2017 under , ,
New Draco-centric story from the kidlet over at AO3! I betaed. I even offered some comments that were not smiley faces.

I know exactly why I walk and talk like a machine (24327 words) by terminally_underwhelmed
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Harry Potter - J. K. Rowling
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: Graphic Depictions Of Violence
Relationships: Minor or Background Relationship(s), Pre-Harry/Draco - Relationship
Characaters: Draco Malfoy, Lucius Malfoy, Narcissa Black Malfoy, Harry Potter, Ron Weasley, Hermione Granger, Blaise Zabini, Luna Lovegood, Arthur Weasley, Astoria Greengrass, more like ace-storia amirite, various OCs, Minor Characters
Additional Tags: Epilogue What Epilogue, War Aftermath, Emotional Growth, Bureaucracy, Pre-Slash, Friendship, headcanon dump
Series: Part 1 of Solitaire/Mercenary
Summary:

They're together when the Dark Lord falls.

Draco is barely aware of his own senses, half-blind and exhausted from months upon months of corrosive fear, and whatever shred of reality is still allotted to him is in his father’s urgent grip on his shoulder and his mother’s hands around his and the way he leans on both of them.

happydork: A graph-theoretic tree in the shape of a dog, with the caption "Tree (with bark)" (Default)
posted by [personal profile] happydork at 10:11pm on 20/07/2017 under
A few years ago, I watched my BFF, [twitter.com profile] amymariemason, spend a year making a beautiful wedding quilt for a friend of hers. I’m not saying my jealousy was the only reason I married [personal profile] such_heights, but I coveted that quilt, oh my goodness I coveted it so hard.

So when [personal profile] such_heights and I got engaged in August 2014, I asked my BFF if she would, maybe, perhaps, make us a wedding quilt, too?

It’s now July 2017, the wedding quilt is finally finished, and OH MY FUCKING GOD IT IS THE MOST AMAZING THING IN ALL EXISTENCE COME LOOK HOW TALENTED MY BFF IS SHE’S THE GREATEST THIS IS THE GREATEST COME LOOK COME LOOK COME LOOK OMG!

Many photos of the world's greatest quilt )
July 19th, 2017
harpers_child: melaka fray reading from "Tales of the Slayers". (Default)
posted by [personal profile] harpers_child at 09:16am on 19/07/2017 under
1. Dad had spine surgery on Monday. He's got rods from L4 to S1 now. He's doing well.

2. Sunday I indulged the stereotype and polished silver. Did mom's everyday teaspoons and the serving pieces out the china cabinet. Might do the place settings this afternoon.

3. Considering doing another round of PT. Not sure if I can be sent for the all of me. If I had to choose something it'd be my shoulders and wrists.
location: mom and dad's
Music:: "There is a Light That Never Goes Out" The Smiths
Mood:: 'sleepy' sleepy
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
posted by [personal profile] runpunkrun at 09:58am on 19/07/2017 under
Selected Poems, by William Carlos Williams: Holy shit, it has to be noted—and I did not do this on purpose—but it took me five years exactly to read this book. I started reading it on July 11, 2012, and finished it on July 11, 2017.

That's exactly how slow going it was.

To my disappointment, not everything William Carlos Williams wrote is as accessible as "The Red Wheelbarrow" and "This is Just to Say," two of his most famous poems. Instead, there's a mix of transparent and opaque.

And then there's Paterson, which he's also known for, a five-volume epic poem that here is presented in extracts, taking up about forty pages instead of its usual three hundred, and seems to be about a grasshopper, a park, geography, some text from a medical journal, a personal letter, and a history lesson. I don't know if it would have made more sense if I had read it in its entirety, but I'm not interested in finding out.

Williams liked to experiment with white space and sentence fragments—he's a contemporary of e e cummings and T. S. Eliot—but his white space lacks the energy and enthusiasm of cummings, or, later, of Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Mostly it just looks jumbled, or unnecessarily spread out, staggered like the teeth of a zipper. The chopped up, incomplete sentences were coarse and seemed to impede meaning rather than free it. I didn't feel like I was discovering or feeling something; I felt like I was tripping over it.

For such a long volume, my notes with my favorite poems and lines don't even take up a whole index card, and I was definitely experiencing William Carlos Williams fatigue by the end. The book collects selected poems from 1914 to 1962, and I found Charles Tomlinson's introduction to be wordy and almost breathless in tone but informative about Williams and his poetry style, though more useful after I'd read the book than before.

My favorite discovery has to be the complete Pictures from Brueghel series. I'd read parts of it before, but didn't realize there was more to it. It's ten poems based on works by Brueghel the Elder, who I encounter quite often in poetry. There's something about his paintings that draws poets to him. It's probably the level of detail, all the little stories going on in these huge lush landscapes full of color and people and animals. The poems I've read have all evoked such clear images, even if I'm unfamiliar with the paintings themselves, and Williams's work is no exception. Though, as always, in order to enjoy Williams's "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" to its fullest, you benefit by knowing the joke behind Brueghel's "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" and the tiny splash Icarus makes down in the corner of the painting where no one is even looking. Just his leg sticking out of the water. Williams captures the humor and sadness of that image, still giving it only slightly more attention than Brueghel did.

It seems I like Williams best when he's being simple and transparent. His complicated, fractured works don't appeal to me as much, and it feels like this collection is more geared toward the latter. But could be it only felt like it.

Contains: rape, classism, and racist language and attitudes.
July 18th, 2017
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
[personal profile] lunabee34 says: "Tell me about the episode (or book chapter) that never appeared in one of your fandoms but should have."

Star Trek TNG: "The Price" is such a god-awful episode that when it leaves those two Ferengi in their shuttlecraft stranded in the Delta Quadrant and doesn't bother to tell us what became of them, that's not even the worst of its crimes. (The worst of its crimes is probably what Crusher and Troi wear to do aerobics.) Anyhow, yes, the Ferengi were acting like jerks, but they didn't deserve to die the kind of death that you'd die stranded in a shuttlecraft 30,000 light-years from home. I think either they should reappear as part of the Borg collective, or the Voyager crew should find them.

Due South: More Ray&Ray. Doesn't everyone want more Ray&Ray? Make RayK go to meet a new informant and discover that it's the Bookman.

The Princess Bride 2: the story of how Buttercup wound up being the Dread Pirate Roberts.
July 17th, 2017
rivkat: Dean reading (dean reading)
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
posted by [personal profile] resonant at 07:48pm on 17/07/2017
- There's a group of people who detest it on principle. Asked to define it, they create a definition that basically sorts everything into two categories: Things I Hate, Which Therefore Belong To the Genre I Hate, and Things I Like, Which Obviously Do Not Belong To the Genre I Hate. (Ask a classic rock fan who hates country about Crosby, Stills, & Nash. Or a classic sci-fi fan who hates fantasy about Pern.)

- Traditionally, about a third of it was worthless due to sentimentality.

- More recently, another third of it is worthless because capitalism endlessly churns it out in identical shiny plastic pieces.

- When it's bad, there's nothing worse.

- When it's good, it captures the human spirit so well that it brings tears to your eyes.
July 16th, 2017
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
Gluten-Free Sweet Treats: Cakes, Brownies, Cookies and More, by Emma Goss-Custard: First, this book is British and, as an American, parts of it made no sense to me. The "gluten-free storecupboard" section at the back goes through various ingredients and where to find them but failed to address my many questions. Mixed spice? Stem ginger in syrup? Damsons?? Turns out those're plums. I know this because I can use Google, but I had to go out of my way for it, and I feel like I'd have to go out of my way to find many of these ingredients, which is an obstacle. The other problem is cultural. I'm never going to make spotted dick because the name makes me want to gag.

Still, the cookbook is adorable and has many good qualities, and there are even a few recipes I'd like to try, but at a certain point I gave up because too many of the ingredients aren't things I keep around. Lyle's Golden Syrup and Lemon Oil amongst them. I continued to flip through and look at the nice pictures, but with less of an expectation I'd find something I could make out of my cupboard.

The good news is that every recipe stands on its own. The book doesn't require a custom flour blend. It uses a lot of polenta, ground nuts and seeds, and very little rice flour. It doesn't address flour substitutions, though. There's an emphasis on fresh fruits, as well as different levels of cream (clotted, double, fraîche). Weirdly a lot of the chocolate recipes call for dark and milk chocolate. Not something I see a lot.

The book itself has cute graphics and a colorful layout. I love that each recipe has an info box that tells the size/number of items it makes, baking time, and if/where/how long it can be stored. The introduction to each recipe sometimes suggests flavor variations but only rarely describes the taste and texture of the item. Add that to the fact it only has colored pictures for a third of the recipes, and that means I only have the ingredient list to go by when judging what the final product is going to be like, and in gluten-free baking it's basically impossible to guess the outcome of throwing together a bunch of nut flours and cornstarch. The British call cornstarch "cornflour" by the way. No way that can end badly.

The recipes give amounts in volume and weight (ounces and grams), and there's a helpful index and an abbreviated introduction to gluten-free baking.

Not something I'm going to come back to, but might be a great cookbook if you're gluten-free and in the UK or have gastronomical ties to the region.
trobadora: (Missy (stylised))
posted by [personal profile] trobadora at 05:29pm on 16/07/2017
*SCREAMS*

ETA: link

Will be coherent later, for now I'm just running around screaming. :D :D :D

ET again A: The clip is now up at the BBC website:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p058vj2q

*STILL SCREAMING*

Another edit - some quotes from Whittaker, Capaldi & Chibnall here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2017/jodie-whittaker-13-doctor
http://variety.com/2017/tv/global/bbc-doctor-who-1202496884/

OMG OMG OMG
July 15th, 2017
harpers_child: melaka fray reading from "Tales of the Slayers". (Default)
posted by [personal profile] harpers_child at 10:15pm on 15/07/2017 under
Ugh. Migraine related desperation led me to take a pain pill that I know I react badly to. Now I have the minor urge to scratch off all my skin. The insides of my eyelids itch. Haven't broken out into hives so far, but that's a possibility. Took benadryl with it, but so far it hasn't helped (or maybe it has and that's why no hives).

Good side the migraine has died down enough I'll probably sleep tonight.

Why bodies, seriously.
Mood:: 'uncomfortable' uncomfortable
happydork: A graph-theoretic tree in the shape of a dog, with the caption "Tree (with bark)" (Default)
I watched A Very British Sex Scandal last night — it’s a great docu-drama made in 2007 about the Wolfenden Report and the Montagu Affair, largely following Peter Wildeblood. The Montagu Affair was a very high profile case in the 1950s in which three men were tried for “homosexual acts” — it’s credited with helping to change public opinion and, eventually, the law. Wildeblood was one of the men tried.

I strongly recommend the film. The docu bit is fascinating — the contributors are queer men born in the 20s and 30s who watched this all play out, including, rather amazingly, Lord Montagu himself.

The drama bit is sweet, compelling, understated, and doesn’t take too many liberties. I was also particularly touched by the context-setting voiceover, which provided us with such gems as, “In 1952 The Daily Mail was a serious establishment newspaper. Its opinions were highly respectable.”

After watching the film, I immediately bought Peter Wildeblood’s Against the Law, first published in 1959, which is largely about Wildeblood’s experiences of being gay, the Montagu Affair, and Wildeblood’s subsequent time in prison. In it he argues equally hard for the decriminalisation of homosexual acts and for penal reform in general. It’s reckoned to be the first sympathetic book about male homosexuality to reach a wide audience in Britain.

It’s hard to overstate how brilliant and brave this book is, and I would have loved it for that no matter how it was written — but it’s also such a clear, spare, honest, witty, engaging piece of writing, one that leaves me feeling both in breathless awe of this hero of a man and, at the same time, like it’s only an accident of space and time that we aren’t friends. When I finished it, I missed him.

Yes, so, I fucking love this book and I recommend it even more strongly than the docu-drama. (I think there’s a new docu-drama coming out pretty soon, actually, called Against the Law? AVBSS was made for the 40th anniversary of decriminalisation, and AtL is for the 50th anniversary. So if you’re only going to watch the one docu-drama, you’ll soon have a choice.)

My version has an intro written by Matthew Parris which I liked a lot and found very interesting but at the same time ended up disagreeing with quite strongly in places. (Which is, tbf, my normal reaction to Matthew Parris.) If you get the same version, I’d suggest not reading the intro until after you’ve read the book itself.

I also wanted to share with you the absolute gut punch I got when reading the very opening paragraph of the book.

Sometimes, when a man is dying, he directs that his body shall be given to the doctors, so that the causes of his suffering and death may be investigated, and the knowledge used to help others. I cannot give my body yet; only my heart and my mind, and trust that by this gift I can give some hope and courage to other men like myself, and to the rest of the world some understanding.


It’s. I don’t know. I read that, and I was struck by how very different it was from David Wojnarowicz’s If I die of AIDS - forget burial - just drop my body on the steps of the FDA — but at the same time, by how strong the thread is that connects them.
harpers_child: melaka fray reading from "Tales of the Slayers". (Default)
posted by [personal profile] harpers_child at 08:11pm on 14/07/2017 under
1. Mom has photos for sale in a local shop. The shop owner made requests for particular kinds of images. There was interest expressed in carrying other things we may do with the pictures like make note cards or necklaces or magnets.

2. I just placed an order for 2 dolls I've been wanting for a while. It's a larger size than I currently have. I feel confident that this won't be a problem since there are currently 4 dolls in SD size I want and Twigling makes 3 of them. (Well, 2 dolls and a head.) I'm getting an Elbe and a Gamine both in vivid skin. Between them I'll have a B bust, C bust, short hip, long hip, short legs, long legs, relaxed hands, and original hands. https://twigling.com/ if anyone is curious but not already into BJD.

3. I gave notice at my job on Wednesday. My last day is July 28th. I cited health as my reason for leaving. I debated trying to work something out with accommodations, but frankly there isn't enough room behind the new registers to put a stool to sit on.
Mood:: 'artistic' artistic
location: home sweet home
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
posted by [personal profile] runpunkrun at 04:39pm on 14/07/2017 under
And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie: From Christie's author's note: "I wrote the book after a tremendous amount of planning, and I was pleased with what I had made of it. It was clear, straightforward, baffling, and yet had a perfectly reasonable explanation; in fact it had to have an epilogue in order to explain it."

It was so perfectly explainable that she had to add an extra bit to the story to explain it. Yes, that makes perfect sense. I often find my own writing to be so straightforward it requires an epilogue to explain.

This is only my second Agatha Christie book, and the only thing I remember about the first one is that it had a million characters and maybe some Siamese cats? I figured this one would at least have fewer characters. I read it because I recently finished Yukito Ayatsuji's The Decagon House Murders, which references this book in both the text and the premise, and I wanted to see how closely the two were related. Ayatsuji borrows a lot from Christie, and adds his own interesting twist on the murderer.

As for Christie, I didn't care much about the characters, and the writing is awkward thanks to a disjointed dialogue style that depends heavily on adverbs, like:

She said grimly:

"This woman was poisoned. Possibly by a toxic amount of -ly adverbs."

He said doubtfully:

"Surely that's not possible?"

She said grimlyer:

"Oh, it's totally possible."

And, as previously complained, the mystery had to be explained in an epilogue. Which isn't how I like my mysteries to be solved.

Contains: antisemitism, colonialism, racism.
ratcreature: RatCreature as Spidey (spidey)
posted by [personal profile] ratcreature at 01:05am on 15/07/2017 under , , , ,
I watched Spider-Man: Homecoming this afternoon, and it was a lot of fun.

cut for spoilers )
trobadora: (MP - missing pieces)
NPT reveals have happened! It was a very short anon period, alas, but now I can actually talk about this. It was my first time writing this fandom - and it's a for a show I've loved for a long time. I used to watch The Pretender on German TV, and read a lot of (English) fanfic on the old pretender.de archive back in 2001/02, checking it almost daily until it vanished. My fic reading dropped off after that, but I never stopped loving the show, and rewatching it - my last full rewatch was in 2015 - only reinforced that. (It holds up very well, in case you were wondering. ♥)

Writing it myself for the first time after all that time felt pretty strange, but in a good way. :)

Title: Set Us Free
Pairing: Miss Parker/Jarod
Rating: PG-13
Summary: Jarod should be used to people being unworthy of trust, but some things hit closer to home than others. - Miss Parker knows how it goes when Jarod calls her in the middle of the night, but some calls are stranger than others.
A/N: This story refers to events from episode 3.04, Someone to Trust, in which Jarod gets himself hired as an arsonist and becomes close to his boss's seemingly-innocent wife. But Kristi isn't what she seems, and Jarod finds himself in trouble. Don't worry if you don't remember the episode well (or at all) - everything in the story should be clear from context.
Written for [personal profile] the_rck as part of Not Primetime 2017.

Originally posted here at AO3.

Set Us Free )
July 14th, 2017
trobadora: (Missy (stylised))
posted by [personal profile] trobadora at 08:20pm on 14/07/2017
It's almost time for the Thirteenth Doctor! Announcement on Sunday!

In 2008/09, when Eleven was cast, I had very definite opinons about who I wanted it to be, and was disappointed both that it wasn't Paterson Joseph, and that it turned out to be a VERY young white bloke. (Also, OMG I hated that leather jacket look - so offputting.)

In 2013, when Twelve was cast, I didn't have specific preferences but hoped for someone who wasn't a young white bloke, and at least got one out of three.

This time? Especially after all the groundwork Moffat has been laying, if it's not a woman this time I'm going to be disappointed. If it's a white man I'm going to be disappointed and angry. And if it's Kris Marshall as has been rumoured, I'm going to be furious and will probably not watch series 11 live.

I haven't really been following the rumour mill, but I've read enough to know that unlike last time, this time round rumours about female candidates have been treated seriously by all involved, which is great. But if they don't do it this time, they'll have lost the last chance to make it mean something other than a tired old "well, better late than never, I suppose."

Cross all your fingers for Thirteen!
July 13th, 2017
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
posted by [personal profile] runpunkrun at 02:53pm on 13/07/2017
Tor.com has this eBook of the Month Club where every month they give away an ebook for a week, and then for the rest of the month there are discussion posts and whatnot. Because it's Tor, the books are always DRM-free, and you can get them in mobi or epub—though only if you live in the US or Canada; sorry, everyone else.

This month, Tor's giving away Kushiel's Dart, by Jacqueline Carey, and I know fandom's got a thing about this series, so I'm passing it along. I think the only reason I know about it in the first place is because of fandom and the crossover/fusion fics that borrow its premise. Which, to quote from that Fanlore article, is:
The books take place in an alternate-Europe during the Renaissance; the primary setting is a country called Terre d'Ange, which is a France-analogue. Its people practice an invented religion whose primary tenet is "Love as thou wilt" - as a result all forms of lovemaking are sacred, and in canon most characters are assumed to be bisexual and there are multiple examples of relationships involving BDSM and polyamory.
So go sign up if this sounds like your sort of thing. You'll get Tor's newsletter, but I honestly enjoy having it pop up in my inbox. Tor.com has interesting articles about science fiction and fantasy, and really great free short fiction, and the newsletter gives you little blurbs about them maybe once a week.

Legal stuff: Kushiel's Dart will be available from July 13th-19th. Download before 11:59 PM ET July 19th, 2017.
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
Gluten-Free Cookies: From Shortbreads to Snickerdoodles, Brownies to Biscotti: 50 Recipes for Cookies You Crave, by Luane Kohnke: Did I take a star off this rating (on Goodreads) because the author used the phrase "yummy-in-the-tummy" (in quotation marks no less?!) in one of the introductions to a recipe? No, but I wanted to. I wanted to so much.

Instead, I will ignore that, and focus on the positives, because there are so many of them. To start with: This book does not require a custom flour mix! Each recipe tells you exactly what you need to make it. The measurements are by volume only, though, which I find to be a bummer in gluten-free cooking. I'm going to try the ginger molasses cookies first, and maybe fool around with converting the measurements to weight using an online calculator or chart. If I can find two that agree.

Most of these cookies are made with brown rice flour and almond flour, along with tapioca and potato starch. The recipes call for xanthan gum, but Kohnke says you can substitute guar gum straight across, which goes against everything I've read, but I guess you can experiment with that if it's your thing. Some of the cookies call for vegetable shortening, which I don't cook with, but I've had good results using ghee or clarified butter in place of Crisco, so I'll try that here. The book has an introduction that goes over ingredients, cooking techniques, and tools for those people who are just starting out, but it doesn't get into substitutions much so you're on your own there. And while these recipes don't require a custom flour blend, they are based on Kohnke's own mix. She says you can use it in your favorite wheat flour-based recipes, too, and provides a handy chart to convert a cup of wheat flour to a cup of her blend with all the individual ingredients listed, so you still don't have to mix up a batch of it and have it hanging around.

The recipes cover a lot of the basics: chocolate chip, gingerbread, jam thumbprint, oatmeal, snickerdoodle, shortbread, biscotti, flourless peanut butter. There are sections on kids' cookies (for kids and/or to make with kids), bar cookies and brownies, holiday cookies, and meringues. One of these things is not like the others.

Each recipe has an introduction that describes the cookie's flavor and texture, and at the bottom it tells you how to store them and how long they'll last. There are lovely color photos for each cookie, and a useful index that is sorted by recipe and ingredients. So you can look for "ginger molasses cookie" or "molasses" and find it in both places. This is definitely a book I'll come back to.
July 12th, 2017
runpunkrun: dana scully reading jose chung's From Outer Space, text: read (reading)
The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, by Mackenzi Lee: Henry "Monty" Montague is off to the continent for his Grand Tour with his best friend Percy and, unfortunately, Monty's little sister and a chaperone. But Monty's dad, The Duke of Whatever, is totally fed up with Monty's rake-like behavior and sets down some strict rules Monty has to follow if he wants to learn how to run the estate when he comes back. Uh, spoiler, he doesn't he follow them.

Elsewhere, I described this as a romp, and I stand by it. It's rompy. It's queer. Monty seemingly goes all ways, and in fact reminds me a lot of some James T. Kirks I've encountered in fanfic—rough childhood, convinced of his own awesomeness (as a defense mechanism), will kiss anything with a mouth, and totally, deeply in love with his best friend who has dark skin and can't eat with the family when company comes. This metaphor is breaking down, but Percy is mixed race, and while Monty might be totally oblivious to what this means for Percy, Percy is more than aware of it, and even if Monty doesn't notice, the story does, which I appreciated a lot.

I couldn't help but like Monty even though he's a self-absorbed little shit. He's loveable and slappable in equal measure. Percy adores him, so there has to be something about him we didn't get to see since we apparently meet him at his worst. In keeping with this, Monty's quest was totally dumb, and if he'd listened to ANYONE even ONCE in his LIFE then NONE of this would have HAPPENED, but then you don't have a book, or a guy who can learn from his mistakes. Which I'm not sure he ever does, but whatever. He cries a lot, too, which I dig.

Good hurt/comfort, friends-to-lovers with lots of sweet snuggling and intimate non-sexual contact, in addition to some brief sexual contact. And a kick-ass sister. Fun, super queer, and a happy (if unrealistic) ending.

Contains: violence, child abuse, suicidal thoughts, racism, homophobia, upsetting attitudes towards chronic illness/disability.

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